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Computing

Computing

“Computers are incredibly fast, accurate, and stupid. Human beings are incredibly slow, inaccurate, and brilliant. Together they are powerful beyond imagination.”

 

—Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

Subject Leader: Mr S. Firth

Subject Governor: Mr E. Fairfield  

Intent Statement

 

At Pinders Primary School we believe technology is an integral and inescapable facet of modern life. We aim to equip our children with the skills they need to live safely in the increasingly digital world understanding that technology underpins every aspect of modern life – be that communicating with others, accessing government services or contributing to the workplace.  We want our children to actively create, manipulate and develop their ideas – harnessing technology to work for them rather than passively consuming digital content. We will work with our pupils to build their understanding of both the benefits and drawbacks of technology allowing them to critically consider the content they encounter online, the choices they make and how to use technology appropriately. We understand that technology is not something that should be shied away from and actively model using technology safely.

 

We believe that technology is a key driver for engagement and leads to increased outcomes for our children. We invest in high quality technology to support our children in all of their learning across the curriculum to give prominence to its importance and safe use. We use our status as a SMART Exemplary School and an LBQ school to promote the benefits of technology within school and to the wider area.

 

Aims in teaching Computing at Pinders Primary School:

We aim to:

  • Prepare children to live in an increasingly digital world.
  • Teach children to actively harness technology rather than passively using it.
  • Encourage children to critically consider their own use of technology.

National Curriculum Programme 

How is Computing Taught?

Our broad and balanced computing curriculum is built around a clear sequence of progression in skills and knowledge. Children will embark on a seamless journey from EYFS to Year 6 which will develop them as independent and critical computer scientists. We have designed our curriculum sequence around a two year rolling cycle. We focus on computer science and algorithms in all years during the autumn term and revisit this with a specific focus on debugging within the summer term. During the spring term we look at data handling, multimedia and networks. Our computing curriculum is taught in discreet blocks throughout the year with clear cross curricular links as appropriate.

 

Understanding our school context, and the issues we see, we deliver our ESafety curriculum separately to highlight its prominence and to proactively tackle ESafety concerns. Our planned ESafety curriculum is delivered five times each year, we also teach additional lessons as required to respond to any emerging concerns.

How do we ensure progression of knowledge of skills?

At Pinders Primary School we have a comprehensive knowledge and skills progression document in place for the teaching of computing. This is used for planning, to ensure a sequenced and appropriate content for specific year groups, as well as a build up of knowledge and skills. Within these documents there are also opportunities for differentiation, in order to meet the needs of all learners. 

Becoming A Computer Scientist

When children are learning about a subject through a discrete teaching session, they are explicitly told that today they are going to be 'Computer Scientists'. They are then reminded of the key skills that they will learn, use and develop within that subject. 

 

In computing these are:

We are learning to:

  • use technology safely
  • solve problems by breaking them into smaller parts
  • think critically and reach logical conclusions
  • consider the audience or end user
  • make efficient choices

Whole School Computing Overview

 

 

Cycle A

Term 1

Cycle A

Term 2

Cycle A

Term 3

Cycle B

Term 1

Cycle B

Term 2

Cycle B

Term 3

EYFS

Ongoing development of skills:

Use of Ipads in provision – access phonics/maths games, apps, camera, video…

QR codes – linked to video, games, songs, defining vocabulary…

Story phones – phonics songs, nativity performances, stories, listening to music…

Computers – navigating a mouse, using a keyboard, selecting icons, computer based apps e.g. paint, selecting programmes…

Beebots – programming, algorithms, navigation…

SMART – all areas of learning, independent access…

Chatterbox – speaking and listening opportunities…

E-safety day

Logging onto computer/Ipads

Printing when using computers…

Key Stage 1

 

‘A world of discovery’

 

Computer Science: Algorithms

Y1 – BeeBots – Explore a mat.

Y2 – Scratch - Explorer Animation

 

 

ESafety Aut1:
Going Places Safely

 

 

Topic: London’s burning’

 

Multimedia:

Mother’s Day Cards/Invites

Y1 – Clicker6

Y2 – Word

 

 

ESafety Spr1:
ABC Searching

 

ESafety Spr2:
Keep it private

 

Topic: Paddington’s Travels’

 

Computer Science: Debugging

Y1 – BeeBots – Debug algorithm to a target location

Y2 – Scratch – Debug Paddington animation

 

ESafety Sum1:

Fun and Games

 

ESafety Sum2:
Sending Email

 

Topic: ‘Enchanted Forest/Toys’

 

Computer Science: Algorithms

Y1 – BeeBots – Explore a mat.

Y2 – Scratch – Traditional tale Animation

 

ESafety Aut1:
 Staying Safe Online

 

 

 

‘Wonderful World’

 

 

Data Handling:

Tables and Pictograms

Microsoft Word

Online Pictogram tools

 

 

ESafety Spr1:
Follow the digital trail

 

ESafety Spr2:
Screen out the mean

 

‘How does your garden grow’

 

Computer Science: Debugging

Y1 – BeeBots – Debug algorithm to a target location

Y2 – Scratch – Debug Paddington animation

 

ESafety Sum1:
 Using Keywords

 

ESafety Sum2:
Sites I like

 

Lower Key Stage 2

 

 

 

Stone Age to Iron Age’

 

Computer Science: Pens and drawing

Scratch – Drawing

 

 

ESafety Aut1:
Powerful Passwords

 

 

 

‘Greeks’

 

Multimedia:

Mother’s Day Cards/Invites

Publisher Bifold

 

ESafety Spr1:
My online community.

 

‘Greeks’

 

Networks:

Local Area Networks

 

 

ESafety

Spr2:
Things for sale

 

 

‘Local Area’

 

Computer Science:

Quiz

 

Computer Science: Sounds/ Composition

Scratch – to be completed in music.

 

 

ESafety Sum1:
Show respect online

 

 

ESafety Sum2:
Good Game

 

 

‘Romans’

 

Computer Science:

Maze Game

Scratch

 

ESafety Aut1:
Rings of responsibly

 

‘Window on the World’

 

Data Handling:

Excel

Enter data and create a bar graph.

 

 

ESafety Spr1:
Private and Personal Information

 

ESafety Spr2:
The Power of Words

 

 

 

 

 

Anglo Saxons

 

Computer Science: Anglo Saxon Animation

Scratch – Drawing

 

ESafety Sum 1

The Key to Keywords?

 

 

 

ESafety Sum 2

Whose is it anyway?

 

 

 

 

Upper Key Stage 2

‘Poppies, Peace and Power’

 

Computer Science:

Scratch – Clocks and Timers

 

 

ESafety Aut1:
Strong Passwords

 

 

Natural Disasters

 

Multimedia:

Mother’s Day Cards/Invites

Publisher quarter-fold cards and envelopes.

 

ESafety Spr1:
Digital Citizen pledge

Natural Disasters

 

Networks:

How does the internet work?

 

 

ESafety Spr2:
You’ve won a prize

 

Space

 

Computer Science:

Microbit Rover

 

ESafety Sum1:
How to Cite a Site

 

ESafety Sum2:
Picture Perfect

 

 

 

Vikings

 

Computer Science:

Scratch – Coin Generator

 

ESafety Aut1:
Talking Safely online

 

ESafety Aut2:
Check our Status

 

 

Egyptians

 

Data Handling:

Excel

Examine data, create line graphs, present findings in PowerPoint.

 

 

ESafety Spr1:
Super Digital Citizen

 

ESafety Spr2:
Privacy Rules

 

 

 

‘Rainforests’

 

Computer Science:

Microbit GPIO pins

 

 

ESafety Sum 1

What’s Cyber Bullying?

 

 

ESafety Sum 2

Selling Stereotypes

 

 

 

 

Reading in Computing

Books flow through the veins of our school. Wherever possible, we use books as stimuli for new topics in all of our subjects. We have a stimulus book for every ESafety lesson and most of our computing blocks. See our book links below:

Cultural Capital

Cultural capital is the accumulation of knowledge, behaviours, and skills that a child can draw upon and which demonstrates their cultural awareness, knowledge and competence; it is one of the key ingredients a pupil will draw upon to be successful in society, their career and the world of work.

Significant people in Computing

When planning our curriculum we highlighted some key significant computer scientists for the children to learn about. These people were chosen for various reasons but are all known for their contributions to the field of computer scientists!

Investing in Learning at Pinders Primary School

At Pinders Primary School we have, and continue to invest in technology. We have recently upgraded many of our boards and computing facilities to engage our pupils, many of which have English as an additional language. Learn more about the SMART solutions and Elementary technology enabled us to transform our classrooms into active learning environments by watching the video below. "I've got a particular passion for children that have got barriers to learning and it's those children that often really benefit from the technology," says Lorna Kemplay, Head Teacher.

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